Wildlife Communities

Wilderness Wildlife

We recognize that despite our best efforts to protect the Earth’s last wildernesses, human beings have instigated change even where no human has set foot. Invasive species, wildlife disease, disruption to fundamental ecological processes all take their toll on the integrity on wilderness.
Each Forever Wild reserve has whole of landscape management for wildlife communities, including the control of invasive species and fire management. Hand-in-hand with our in-situ reserve management activities, Forever Wild runs a dedicated Wildlife Health and Rehabilitation Centre for keystone ecological and threatened species, led by Dr. Annabelle Olsson. Annabelle is a world-renowned specialist in Australasian wildlife, and her work is critical to build knowledge on the biology of wilderness species found nowhere else on Earth.

The facility, based in North Queensland, not only provides medical care and rehabilitation of species back into Australian wilderness locations, but conducts biological research that could be critical to species’ long-term survival.

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Species programs

Specific species research and management programs on the Tropical Wetlands reserve are run for:

  • Northern Quoll
  • Black-throated finch
  • Gouldian finch
  • Various species of wild rice
  • Northern bettong

Ecological management

Forever Wild actively manages our reserves to maintain the integrity of their ecological function including:

  • Fire management and burning based on traditional and contemporary knowledge
  • Control of invasive species using a diversity of management tool, including pastoralism for introduced grasses
  • Feral vertebrate control particularly for feral pigs, cats and other species that cause serious damage

Wilderness rivers

The waters of our Tropical Wetlands reserve flow west into the Mitchell River, part of the Cape York bioregion. Over the years to come Forever Wild will work to directly protect some of the last wild and free river systems in Australia. The natural and unregulated functioning of these rivers is critical, as they form an integral component of ecological function of wilderness landscapes.